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kava history Tag

When you think of Hawaii, what immediately comes to mind?  Coconuts?  Palm trees?  Outsiders to Hawaii most often think of this group of islands as a tourist destination, not a rich traditional culture.  So tourists to Hawaii hole up in a resort and drink nothing but beer and martinis…all the while not realizing that Hawaiian culture provides, a safe, mellow alternative: kava, or as the Hawaiian natives call it, “awa”. Newcomers to kava

Hawaii, like many Polynesian islands, has a long history of using kava—traditionally called “awa” by the native population. This state is home to several strains that even seasoned kava drinkers may not be aware of but are worth exploring. Hawaii boasts 13 strains, all of which are suitable for drinking. This article will profile five of them. Hiwa Pronounced “Hee-vuh” this cultivar of kava is also known as “Black Kava” because the stems of

Americans are well acquainted with beer, but that can of Budweiser you’re drinking right now probably doesn’t have its traditional uses—or legends.  But there is an archipelago, called Tonga, in the South Pacific with a traditional drink called kava—it means “bitter” in the Tongan language, named after the taste—with its own ceremonies and origin legends.  This is because Tongans have been using this plant for thousands of years, and its use permeates